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Justin Treagus

 Justin Treagus

Justin joined the Committee for Auckland as Omega's Programme Director in January 2008. Justin brings a diverse array of experience in Leadership, Learning, Organisational Development and Change Management.  His experience includes roles in Corporate, Consulting and Non Profit Organisations, with his work varying from developing E-Business capability within a global corporation, to piloting and developing a best practice adolescent peer leadership programme in Africa.
His passion for cultural diversity developed from living and working through South Africa’s transformation into a multicultural society and being part of a global organisation in Europe that actively pursued cultural diversity.  Married to a Kiwi, Justin moved from Cape Town to New Zealand four years ago.

Alistair Kwun

 Alistair Kwun

Alistair Kwun has over seven years experience working in cross-cultural communications and the creative industries. He leads the public relations activities around ‘Going Bananas’, an annual community leadership conference that throws a spotlight on the social, economic and cultural capital of Chinese Diaspora communities. Alistair is a regular commentator in the media on intercultural issues and a strategic communications advisor to policy frameworks and research clusters. He has lived and worked across Europe, Asia and the USA.

Rina Tagore

 Rina Tagore

Rina Tagore is a Principal Policy Analyst, Forums and Engagement Regional Strategy, Community and Cultural Policy at Auckland Council. Since moving to New Zealand from New Delhi, India, she has worked in local government in social and community planning—strong communities, civic participation, inter-cultural spaces and diversity. Her professional experiences lie in social development and international development aid. Areas of work include capacity building, planning and evaluation, gender and institutional development and group relations.

She has a keen interest in the social dynamics of identity and belonging, and processes that build and sustain social capital.

Professor Graeme Hugo

Professor Graeme Hugo

Graeme Hugo is University Professorial Research Fellow, Professor of the Department of Geographical and Environmental Studies and Director of the National Centre for Social Applications of Geographic Information Systems at the University of Adelaide. His research interests are in population issues in Australia and South East Asia, especially migration. His books include Australia’s Changing Population (Oxford University Press), The Demographic Dimension in Indonesian Development (with T. H. Hull, V. J. Hull and G. W. Jones, Oxford University Press), International Migration Statistics: Guidelines for Improving Data Collection Systems (with A.S. Oberai, H. Zlotnik and R. Bilsborrow, International Labour Office), Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at Century’s End (with D. S. Massey, J. Arango, A Kouaouci, A. Pellegrino and J. E. Taylor, Oxford University Press), several of the 1986, 1991 and 1996 census based Atlas of the Australian People Series (AGPS), Australian Immigration: A Survey of the Issues (with M. Wooden, R. Holton and J. Sloan, AGPS), New Forms of Urbanisation: Beyond the Urban-Rural Dichotomy (with A. Champion, Ashgate) and Australian Census Analytic Program: Australia’s Most Recent Immigrants (Australian Bureau of Statistics). In 2002 he secured an ARC Federation Fellowship over five years for his research project, "The new paradigm of international migration to and from Australia: dimensions, causes and implications". He is currently working on reports on Migration and Development for the Australian Government and for the Asian Development Bank.

Professor Jan Rath

Professor Jan Rath

Prof. Dr. Jan Rath is Professor of Urban Sociology and Director of the Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies (IMES) at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He received his MA degree in cultural anthropology and urban studies and his PhD from Utrecht University. An anthropologist, he has also been active in political science, the sociology of law, economics and economic sociology. He previously held academic posts at Leiden University, Utrecht University, the Catholic University of Nijmegen, and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He is the author or editor of numerous articles, book chapters and reports on the sociology, politics and economics of post-migratory processes, including Western Europe and its Islam: The Social Reaction to the Institutionalization of a ‘New’ Religion in the Netherlands, Belgium and the United Kingdom (Leiden/Boston/Tokyo: Brill, 2001), Unravelling the Rag Trade: Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Seven World Cities (Oxford: Berg, 2002), Immigrant Entrepreneurs Venturing Abroad in the Age of Globalization (Oxford: Berg, 2003), Tourism, Ethnic Diversity and the City (London/New York: Routledge, 2007) and Ethnic Amsterdam (Amsterdam University Press 2009).

Professor Christian Dustmann

Professor Christian Dustmann

Christian Dustmann is Professor at the Department of Economics, University College London. He is also Director of CReAM, the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration. He has a Ph.D. in Economics from the European University Institute (1992), and received his ''Habilitation'' from the University of Bielefeld in 1997. He is an editor of the Journal of Population Economics, an associate editor of the Economic Journal, and research fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), London, and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); he is a research associate of the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), London.  His main research interests are in population economics (migration, economics of the family), and labour economics (education, wage structures, and earnings mobility), and he has widely published in these areas.

Professor Arthur Sweetman

Professor Arthur Sweetman

Arthur Sweetman is a Professor in the Department of Economics at McMaster University in Canada where he holds the Ontario Research Chair in Health Human Resources. His interests focus primarily on empirical economic issues related to health labour market, general labour market, social, and health policy. Canadian immigration economics and policy is a focus of his research and he is currently pursuing projects looking at internationally educated health professionals. In 2010 two of his co-edited volumes were published by McGill-Queen’s University Press: Canadian Immigration: Economic Evidence for a Dynamic Policy Environment (co-edited with Ted McDonald, Elizabeth Ruddick, and Christopher Worswick), and Pursuing Higher Education in Canada: Economic, Social, and Policy Dimensions (co-edited with Ross Finnie, Marc Frenette, and Rick Mueller).  Other research topics include economic issues in education, program evaluation, poverty, employment insurance, and microfinance.

 

 

Associate Professor Ellie Vasta

Associate Professor Ellie Vasta

Ellie Vasta is Associate Professor at the Centre for Research on Social Inclusion, Macquarie University, Sydney. From 2003 until 2009 she was a Senior Researcher at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society at the University of Oxford.  Ellie's recent work in Britain and Europe has focused on immigrant work strategies and networks in London with specific emphasis on immigrant participation, identity, community, and on irregularity; on racism; and on the ideological shifts in the European models of immigrant inclusion, focusing on policies and public discourses. Her current projects include preparing a book on ‘immigration and the new politics of solidarity’ and another project on ‘belonging’. Recent publications include Vasta, E and Vuddamalay, V. (eds) (2006) International Migration and the Social Sciences: confronting national experiences in Australia, France and Germany, Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan; Vasta, E and Kandilige, L (2010), ‘London the Leveller: Ghanaian work strategies and community solidarity’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 581-598; Vasta, E. ‘Immigrants and the paper market: borrowing, renting and buying identities’, (forthcoming 2010), Journal of Ethnic and Racial Studies; Vasta, E. ‘The controllability of difference: social cohesion and the new politics of solidarity, Ethnicities (Special Issue forthcoming 2010-11).

 

Distinguished Professor Barry R. Chiswick

Distinguished Professor Barry R. Chiswick

Barry R. Chiswick is Professor of Economics and Chair of the Department of Economics at George Washington University in Washington DC. Prior to that he was UIC Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Professor Chiswick received his Ph.D. with Distinction in Economics from Columbia University (1967) and has held permanent and visiting appointments at UCLA, Columbia University, CUNY, Stanford University, Princeton University, Hebrew University (Jerusalem), Tel Aviv University, University of Haifa, and the University of Chicago. Professor Chiswick has an international reputation for his research in Labor Economics, Human Resources, the Economics of Immigration, the Economics of Minorities, the Economics of Religion, and Income Distribution.  He is recognized as having done the seminal research on the Economics of Immigration, and continues to be the leader in the field. His research has been published in 14 books and monographs and in over 150 scholarly journal articles and chapters in books, in addition to other publications.  His latest book is The Economics of Language (with Paul W. Miller), Routledge, 2007.  His research is cited frequently in textbooks and in the academic literature. In addition to numerous seminar and conference presentations in the United States, Professor Chiswick has lectured in 22 other countries across the globe.

Professor William A.V. Clark

Professor William A.V. Clark

William A.V. Clark has BA and MA degrees from the University of New Zealand and a PhD from the University of Illinois. He is Professor in the Department of Geography, with a joint appointment in Statistics, at UCLA.  He teaches undergraduate courses on population, migration and ethnicity, and graduate classes on international migration and spatial demography. He has published extensively on demographic change and investigated models of residential mobility and the sorting processes that bring about residential segregation in the urban mosaic. He has lectured and taught in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Canada and published several books including Human migration (Sage) and Households and Housing: Choices and Outcomes in the Housing Market (Rutgers) and most recently - The California Cauldron: Immigration and the Fortunes of Local Communities (1998) and Immigrants and the American Dream: Remaking the Middle Class (2003).  He was a fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences in 1993 and held a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1994-95. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands, in 1992 and a DSc from the University of Auckland in 1994. He is a member of the Royal Society of New Zealand and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2005 he was inducted into the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and in 2008 will be a Senior Fulbright specialist at Victoria University Wellington.